Hotelory – Supporting hotels in meeting the UK COVID19 regulations are guidelines.

Hotelory is here to support you with the re-oping and running of your hotel or guest accommodation. Guest accommodations include: b&b’s, holiday parks, hostels, motels, campsites, caravan sites etc. (Anywhere where a number of guest are placed.)

Using the guidelines and regulations shared by the National UK, gov.uk, and other trusted government resource. The Covid19 relevant and required information have been merged together and broken down into 8 different sections:

  1. Thinking about risk
  2. keeping your customers, visitors and contractors safe
  3. Who should go to work?
  4. Social distancing at work
  5. Cleaning the building or site for consumers
  6. Personal protective equipment (PPE) and face coverings
  7. Workforce management
  8. Inbound and outbound goods (For further guidelines on the UK’S COVID19 Guidelines and Regulations please visit the gov.uk who also sate you should check for updates upon other trusted platforms website where you can view all the UK approved latest hospitality approve covid -19 approved guidelines and regulations. )

For further support with meeting the Covid19 UK government guidelines please complete the hotelory training program or email: [email protected]

Depending on the nature of your business each business will need to adapt taking specific actions to protect staff and consumers within the workplace. The actions taken will depend on the type and size of the business, how it is operated, managed, regulated and organised. This is down by completing a unique All COVID-19 risk assessment. As every business is different the government has issued guidance and guidelines which can be used within all sectors.

This guidance does not supersede any legal obligations relating to health and safety, equalities or employment. It is important that as a business or an employer you continue to comply with your existing obligations. When complying with these existing obligations there are non-stationary guidance to take into account. When considering how to apply the guidelines, take into account other people such as contractors, agency workers, trainees, employees, guest and general visitors.

If for some reason your hotel/other guest accommodation premises are let out to operate for specific usage or third party contractors. Both parties should carry out Risk Assessments and ensure that responsibility for safety management is and agreed and clearly articulated.

The Hotelory offers FREE online training for staff within the hospitality industry to help them understand what the guidelines require from them. Designed to help safe feel more comfortable and safer at work.

Section 1.

Managing risks 

  1. Benefits of involving workers: 
  2. Benefits of a Health Representative:
  3. What to think about when looking for risks? 
  4. What to think about when managing risks? 
  5. Managing Risk – What to do to assist with eliminating the spread 
  6. How to raise concern if you are an employee 
  7. WHAT IS THE (HSE):  
  8. Benefits if the (HSE) 
  9. WHAT IS THE (EHO): 
  10. Benefits of the EHO: 

Objective: A COVID-19 risk assessment is to be carried out by all employees. 

Everyone needs to assess and manage the risks of COVID-19, consider the risks to their workers, volunteers and customers.  

Your legal responsibility is to protect workers and others from risk to their health and safety. This means you need to think about and acknowledge the risks they face, doing everything in your power to minimise them, recognising you cannot completely eliminate the risk of COVID-19. Everyone needs to assess and manage the risks of COVID-19, consider the risks to their workers, volunteers and customers.  

Your legal responsibility is to protect workers and others from risk to their health and safety. This means you need to think about and acknowledge the risks they face, doing everything in your power to minimise them, recognising you cannot completely eliminate the risk of COVID-19. 

You must ensure that your risk assessment outlines the risks of COVID-19. A risk assessment is about identifying sensible measures to the making a record of the significant findings and to control risks in your workplace. Taking preventative measures reducing workplace risk to the lowest, practical and reasonable level. 

Benefits of involving workers: 
  • Gives each employee the opportunity to voice their opinions 
  • Allows workers a chance to share and receive knowledge with others 
  • improves the relationship between employees 
  • It encourages a strong sense of teamwork among workers 
  • Those that do the work are often the best people to understand the risks in the work place. 
  • By involving staff, it shows them that you are taking their health seriously 
  • It helps employees to feel more comfortable and safer within the work environment 

Benefits of a Health Representative: 
  • Higher departments are able to consult workers through the Health and Safety Representative 
  • Those that do the work are often the best people to understand the risks in the work place. 
  • In charge of updating the risk assessment, and storing dater required 
  • In charge of sharing result of the risk assessment carried out.
  • In charge of updating employees of any new (Covid-19) government rules and regulations  

What to think about when looking for risks? 
  • The journey of staff and guest 
  • Interaction areas and points 
  • This that are touched/used 
  • Identify who is high risk within the work place 

What to think about when managing risks? 
  • The journey of staff and guest  
  • Interaction areas and points 
  • Things that are touched/used  
  • Can items be removed 
  • To place sanitiser or antiseptic wipes next to shared item 
  • Repositioning staff to where there work back to back or side to side rather than face to face.
  • To place sanitiser or disinfectant in common touch points or high footfall areas 
  • If things are regular touched, considering a wipe down routine  
  • Increase frequency of washing hands 
  • Using barriers or fixed screens  
  • Carry out developments preplanning the layout of your common areas
  •  Employee covid19 testing/daily temperature testing etc. 
  • To consider security implications as any revisions may present new or altered security risks which may need mitigations. 
  • Where social distancing guidelines cannot be followed, businesses should consider whether the businesses need to carry out that activity at all in order for the business to still operate. So, businesses may need to wait for further guidelines before fully operating all areas.  

Managing Risk – What to do to assist with eliminating the spread 
  • Increase frequency of surfacing cleaning 
  • Increase frequency of hand-washing 
  • Make working from home an option to lower hours needed at work 
  • 1m – 2m with risk mitigation 
  • Where 2m is not able, consider setting out mitigations you will introduce on your risk assessment. 
  • If able remove areas or activities where social distancing guidelines cannot be followed. 
  • Take all actions possible to reduce the risk of transmissions between people. 
  • Keeping activities and contact where social distancing cannot be maintained as short as possible. 
  • Positioning works slide to side or if possible, back to back (rather than face to face) 
  • Using barriers or fixed screens to separate people from each other. 
  • Creating fixed teams or partnering staff to produce a number of people each person has contacted with or who they work with. 
  • No one should be forced to work in an unsafe environment 
  • If people are to work face to face this should only be for a sustained period, within their small group of assigned partners 
  • All activity are to be assets before being carried out, ensuring it is safe to go ahead 
  • Pointing out who is most vulnerable to Covid-19 
  • Consider security implications of any changes you intend you make as new adaptations or revisions may alter or create new security risks which may need mitigations. 
  • Consider recognised advise that has been produced for your sector, e.g. trade union/trade associations 

How to raise concern if you are an employee 
  • Contact Hotelory covid-19 Support team 
  • Contact (HSE) 
  • Contact your train union or Health representative 
  • Covid-19 Helpline 03007906787 (Monday- Friday, 8:30am to 5pm) 

WHAT IS THE (HSE): The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It prevents work-related death, injury and ill health. … HSE is an executive non-departmental public body, sponsored by the Department for Work and Pensions. 

Benefits if the (HSE) 

  • Identify employers who are not taking the right actions in meeting the relevant public health guidance and legislation in controlling public health risks. 
  • Cover eliminating risks to employees 
  • Deliver a range of actions to improve control of workplace risks. 
  • Take appropriate action to socially distance where required 
  • Specific advice to employees to help secure improvements 
  • Issue of enforcement notices 

WHAT IS THE (EHO): Environmental health officers are responsible for monitoring and enforcing health and hygiene legislation. They also investigate when there’s an incident, such as pollution, a noise problem, toxic contamination, pest infestation or an outbreak of food poisoning. 

Benefits of the EHO: 
  • Take samples and photographs of food for further analysis. 
  • Seize or detain any foods that they suspect are unfit for sale or consumption. 
  • Inspect any records and documentation held by your premises. 
Important factors:
  1. Currently the government guidance states that all indoor accommodations with their own designated shower or en suite showering facilities will be able to reopen. Accommodations with shared toilet or shower facilities must run or have a support bubble using a reservation cleaning rota. 
  2. It has been outlined that the following businesses even offering accommodation must remain closed: casinos, nightclubs, indoor play areas, ice skating rings, bowling alleys, spas, water parks and swimming pools. 

2. Keeping your customers, visitors and contractors safe 

(Different decisions for different accommodation types)

Objective: As accommodations types differ, to ensure consumer safety it important we consider the factors which are unique to them.  

Attention should be given to: 

  • Making reception areas safer 
  • Increased cleaning 
  • Keeping activity time as short as possible 
  • Considering placing screens between guests and staff 
  • Minimising lift usage from reception 
  • Providing clear signage for new lift rules 
  • Providing clear signage for new measures 
  • Room service/butler’s placing trays outside door 
  • Encouraging tips to be added to the bill. 
  • Ensuring staff follow government hand-washing guidelines. 
  • Checklist of all hand contact services are cleaned after guests vacates. 
  • Encouraging guests and staff to wear masks in communal areas and communal corridors. 
  • Regular check the latest government guidance, guidelines and regulations. 
  • Regularly check on the government opening of additional guest facilities e.g. saunas, swimming pools, gyms etc. 
  • Ensuring that dining and bar areas are compliant with the UK hospitality government guidance before opening them to the public. 

Hotels 

Attention should be given to: 

  • Make reception areas safer 
  • Increased cleaning  
  • Keeping activity time as short as possible 
  •  Considering placing screens between guests and staff 
  • Minimising lift usage from reception, and providing clear signage for new lift rules 
  • Providing clear signage for new lift rules 
  • Providing clear signage for new measures 
  • Close dormitory rooms (except when the same support bubble or household are holding a party.) 
  • Closing shared facilities such as: 
  1. Tv rooms
  2. Communal rooms
  3. Communal Kitchens
  4. Changing facilities
  5. Shower facilities
  6. Toilet facilities
  • Encourage guest and staff to wear masks in common areas/communal corridors. 

(Rooms where social distancing cannot be managed, its said that the area must be cleaned thoroughly between reservations. The area must also be assigned to a support bubble or household group to ensure that the space is use by one person at a time.) 

  • Increase safe ventilation 
  • Ensuring that any bar or dining area is only opened when in compliant with UK government guidance on the hospitality sector. 

Bed & Breakfasts 
  • Focus on making reception areas safer 
  • Clean keys between guests. 
  • Encouraging tips to be added to the bill. keeping activity time within the reception area as short as possible   
  • Increase cleaning 
  • Considering adding addition of screens between guests and staff. 
  • Drop/collect butler’s trays from outside door 
  • Ensuring housekeeping staff are carrying out government hand-washing guidelines
  • Making a checklist of all hand contact services. 
  • Cleaning and making a log as each guest vacate. 
  • Encouraging guests and staff to wear masks in common areas. 
  • Clean facilities regularly throughout the day and at the end of each day 

Self catering accommodation

( holiday apartments, homes, cottages, bungalows, boats including holiday hire, and serviced accommodation.)

  • Ensure staff clean the accommodation between stays 
  • Follow government hand-washing guidelines 
  • Ensure social distancing is maintain when handing over keys 
  • Clean keys after each hand over. 
  • Make a comprehensive checklist to be completed when guest vacate, ensuring the property has been clean thoroughly after each guest stay. 

Boat Operators 

  • Apply social distance measures for when handing and collecting the boat 
  • Clean boat between users and at the end of each day 
  • Set up cleaning routines after each hire, coving: 
  1. All surfaces 
  2. Handrails 
  3. Toilets 
  4. Bathroom’s  
  5. Spray all fabric  
  6. Cupboard nods/door knobs and handles 

 Caravan parks and campsites 

  • Make reception areas safer 
  • Increased cleaning,  
  • Keeping activity time as short as possible  
  • Considering placing of screens between guests and staff 
  • Minimising lift usage from reception, and providing clear signage for new lift rules 
  • Providing clear signage for new lift rules 
  • Providing clear signage for new measure 
  • Close dormitory rooms (except when the same support bubble or household are holding a party.) 
  • Closing shared facilities such as: 
  1. Tv rooms 
  2. Communal rooms 
  3. Communal kitchens  
  4. Changing facilities 
  5. Shower facilities 
  6. Toilet facilities 
  7. Water pints 
  8. Washing up points
  9. Waste points 

  • Encourage guest and staff to wear masks in common areas/communal corridors. 
  • (Rooms where social distancing cannot be managed its said that the area must be cleaned thoroughly between reservations The area must also be assigned to a support bubble or household group to ensure that the space is use by one person at a time.) 
  • Increase safe ventilation 
  • Ensuring that any bar or dining area is only opened when in compliant with UK government guidance on the hospitality sector. 
  • Clean facilities regularly throughout the day and at the end of each day 
  • Ensure children’s indoor/outdoor play areas are closed 
  • If children areas are open ensure they are in line with wider government guidance.  

Managing contacts

Objective: To minimise the contact resulting from visits to hotels and guest accommodation. 

  • Provide contractors and guests guidelines regarding visiting the premises prior arrival. 
  • Give mobile, email or online access to staff and guest to communicate; this will lower the demand received in the reception area.. 
  • To provide contractors and guest information of guidelines at the point of arrival. 
  • Have sanitiser available for guest to use when entering your premises and as the move between the different facilities/rooms. 
  • Managing an outside queuing system to ensure to avoid over crowding and to avoid causing a risk to employees or other individuals. (This could include having staff directing guest, using barriers, on 2 meter distance floor markings.) 
  • Working with local businesses and authorities to decide on how to control the spread. Working together: For example staggering opening and closing hours; this would help manage overcrowding, assisting with managing the demand on public transport. 
  • Controlling the movement within the reception area, for example: Placing floor markers or changing check/checkout times. 
  • Encouraging guests to use hand sanitiser or hand-washing facilities as they enter the premises and regularly during their stay as they move between areas in the facility. 
  • Taking measures to avoid crowded reception areas, such as staggering check-in and check-out times or placing markers on the floor to maintain social distancing. 
  • Revise contractor visits and cancel schedules unless their essential. 
  • Reduce overlapping between people reducing interaction. For example; services can be carried out at night, or early hours of the morning. 
  • Encourage contact payments for rom bookings, reasurant/food bills/ facilties etc. 

Selling food and drink

Objective: To manage/control interactions at the venue from the service to delivery and collect of food and drink. 

  • Maintaining social distancing (with risk mitigation where 2m is not viable include risk mitigations for where the 2m cannot be achieved. 
  • Using social distance markings to guide guest/customers to maintain 2m social distancing. 
  • Minimising customer self-service of condiments, cutlery and food. cutlery and condiments to reduce risk of transmission.  
  • Ensuring the 2m is used when encouraging contactless payments. 
  • Providing only disposable condiments or cleaning non-disposable condiment containers after each use. 
  • Ask customers to touch or lean on the counter when awaiting their takeaway. 
  • Reducing the number of surfaces touched by both staff and customers. For example, staff are to only touch the counter when necessary, staff that need to touch the counter are to wear protective gloves etc. 
  • Make sure everything that is cover has ventilation. For example: leaving the lid open/ajar or opening the sides.  
  • minimise staff contact with customers by adjusting the service approach. Where possible use Indoor table service, with further supporting measures such as: placing tables outdoors, assigning staff to specific tables, when approach revert customers back to their table.   
  • Place clear signage of the new Adjustments so guest are aware they are to remain seated For example: only staff are to lay out and collect the glasses and cutlery. 
  • Minimising contact between guest and front of house workers where appropriate. For Example: When making a sale refer guest to the website where they can make purchases from in their room, using tables or screen barriers. front of house workers and customers at points of service where appropriate to ensure social distancing guidelines. 2m, or 1m with risk mitigation where 2m is not viable, is acceptable.) 

Providing and explaining available guidance 

Objective: To ensure people have the relevant information needed to maintain their safety. 

Steps that will usually be needed: 

  • Providing clear social distancing guidance to people on arrival and before arrival. For example: send out pre-arrival, visual aids, signage. Considering guests that have impairments. 
  • Displaying social distancing guideline within the reception and front entrance. 
  • Provide verbal or written communication to both workers and customers of the latest guidelines of outside and inside the hotel or accommodation. (This could be done by displaying posters or information.) 

For fully consideration on rules and regulations accommodation types please view the UKHospitality guidance 

Follow the government guidelines with The Hotelory!

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